Renters Now Rule Half of U.S. Cities

 

Creative and Practical Ways To Use LEGO Around the House (Without Stepping On Any!)

~ warning these are not all House related, but they are all fun and creative! ~

Apartments With Tiny Layout Nail Why Rental Prices Are Out of Control

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Apartments With Tiny Layout Nail Why Rental Prices Are Out of Control

This Photo Shows a Shower in Kitchen in San Francisco

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From @Brockkeeling

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San Francisco holds the honor of being the most expensive city in the U.S. to rent a one-bedroom apartment with the cost at almost $3,600 per month, according to Time.

An apartment listing in the city perfectly illustrates the absurd lengths property owners are going to in order to squeeze as much money as they can out of their holdings – and the tiny amount of space renters are finding available for vast sums of money.

The picture, of a tiny apartment with a full shower and toilet in its kitchen, was one of four posted on the rental site Nextdoor, enticing renters to live in a “newly renovated tiny studio apartment” with “easy parking” and “quiet” available for $2,000 per month. The listing doesn’t mention the unit’s size, but Sfist, who first posted it, believes it’s around 200 square feet – and was likely converted from a large storage closet.

Since access to Nextdoor is limited by neighborhood, it was difficult for media outlets to confirm the veracity of the photo but Reddit users on a thread about the kitchen/bathroom combo narrowed its location down to the intersection of Laurel and Pacific in the Presidio Heights neighborhood.

 kramer sienfeld shower phone GIF

Needless to say, the arrangement is not sanitary. “Fecal plumes could be a problem,” as Elizabeth Lopatto, science editor at The Verge, put it to Curbed SF. It’s also a violation of San Francisco’s building codes.

Shockingly (or not), the San Francisco toilet-in-kitchen is not unique. There’s at least one Sydney, Australia, studio features a toilet just inches away from the kitchen sink. There are a number of small New York City apartments with a bathtub in the kitchen, a leftover from an era where tenement owners didn’t want to install two sets of hot water pipes.

Bathtub in KitchenHUffington Post

But it’s not just pricey coastal enclaves that face skyrocketing rents as real estate website Curbed described it as a cycle that’s playing out across the country. As noted on rental apartment site Street Easy, a kitchen in bathroom combo one year ago in the trendy New York City East Village neighborhood was listed for $1,900 per month.

Street Easy New York City Apartment Street Easy

It noted how the scarcity of homes drives up housing prices, which forces people to rent, which drives up rental prices, too. Rent is now the highest-rising expense in almost every major U.S. city, according to CNBC.

It starts with a near standstill on the construction of new starter homes, caused by what developers see as an avalanche of new regulations, requirements, fees, building codes and permits.

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“[T]he last decade has seen nine million Americans become new renters, the largest 10-year gain in history, pushing the percentage of households that rent from 31 to 37 percent, the highest level since the Johnson administration. That’s all happening at the same time the country is losing roughly 125,000 affordable rental units a year,” according to Curbed.

Beyond that, those who already own homes are finding it harder and harder to move up in the market. “The number of starter homes on the market dropped by 44 percent,” according to CNBC.

Mayors around the country are trying to find solutions to the affordable housing crunch, including tax credits for redevelopment, new policies to ensure more low-and mixed-income housing, and easing regulations, as Curbed reports.

 shower GIF

But the crisis is getting virtually no attention at the federal level. In fact, the Trump administration’s budget draft slashes funding for Housing and Urban Development (HUD), home ownership programs, and neighborhood development.

Lastly, there’s been no word on whether the “apartment” with the kitchen/bathroom combo in San Francisco was rented or other apartments with similar layouts in other parts of the country. .

Pomona about to close escrow on property that will house homeless shelter tent

Pomona about to close escrow on property that will house homeless shelter tent

Pomona is taking steps leading to establishing an emergency shelter-service center for the city’s homeless residents on property at 1400 E. Mission Blvd. Among the work is evaluating existing buildings, such as this one, for use as part of the service center.
Pomona is taking steps leading to establishing an emergency shelter-service center for the city’s homeless residents on property at 1400 E. Mission Blvd. Among the work is evaluating existing buildings, such as this one, for use as part of the service center. PHOTO BY MONICA RODRIGUEZ

With just days left before the property at 1400 E. Mission Blvd. closes escrow and goes into the hands of Pomona, city administrators and staff are taking steps leading to establishing an emergency shelter-service center for the city’s homeless residents on the site. The city is evaluating existing buildings, such as this one, for their future use.
With just days left before the property at 1400 E. Mission Blvd. closes escrow and goes into the hands of Pomona, city administrators and staff are taking steps leading to establishing an emergency shelter-service center for the city’s homeless residents on the site. The city is evaluating existing buildings, such as this one, for their future use.
PHOTO BY MONICA

Then, barring any unexpected circumstances, by the end of the year the land at 1400 E. Mission Blvd. will be home to a year-round emergency shelter and service center for the homeless, the first in the city.

The aim is to have it ready in time to for the coming winter. Currently, the Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority offers a winter shelter program at the Pomona Armory.

Deputy City Manager Kirk Pelser said Tuesday the property is expected to close escrow Friday or Monday at the latest. But even before the property in southeast Pomona is in the city’s control, preparations are underway to establish the emergency shelter-service center.

The city plans to erect a large tent to serve as the shelter, but officials are also checking out how to incorporate the buildings on the property.

“We’re looking at the infrastructure of the site itself,” said Benita DeFrank, Pomona’s Neighborhood Services director. “We’re working with consultants looking for an operator” for the facility.

The preparations are meant to expedite the facility’s evolution.

“We don’t want to waste time or money,” she said.

Once the facility is up and running, it will offer residents without shelter a place to stay and begin making their way back to permanent housing.

About two weeks ago, representatives from each city department walked through the property with a request from DeFrank in mind.

“I asked for an honest review of the property,” she said.

Reports from each department will start landing in her in-box this week, DeFrank said, and the information in them will play a significant role in plotting out the next steps and the timeline for establishing the facility.

So far, no glaring problems have been found on the site, but “we’re being cautious as we mover forward,” she said.

In November, the Pomona City Council authorized staffers to buy the East Mission Boulevard property from the Gene Stalians 1989 Trust for $1.7 million. In late January, the council members gave the green light for the combination emergency shelter and service center on the property.

The facility will consist of a giant semi-permanent tent-like structure resembling those used for entertainment events or for military purposes. The structure, which will accommodate 175 people, will be insulated, equipped with windows, heating and air conditioning systems. It will have a system of dividers to create areas for men, women and LGBT residents.

Portable restrooms, showers, laundry facilities and a dog kennel, will be among the features. A key component of the facility will be a centralized kitchen where nonprofits and faith-based groups that prepare meals for the homeless residents.

Through the service center, homeless individuals will be able to access basic health and behavioral health services in addition to other services.

The city expects to pay for the facility using some housing bond proceeds, DeFrank said. A consultant will also assist in determining how much it will cost to operate the program.

The city is also researching how it can access funds generated by Measure H, the Los Angeles County ballot measure that voters approved by a slim margin March 7. Measure H calls for increasing the sales tax in L.A. County by 1/4 percent sales tax that would generate about $355 million a year for 10 years to be used to prevent and address homelessness.

A group has been established that will provide oversight of the funding, DeFrank said, but “we’re waiting for that group to meet and release the parameters to get funds.”

Mayor Tim Sandoval said having the facility open will be “a huge step forward for us” as the city works to address homelessness in the city.

During a community meeting held Monday night at the Kennedy Park Community Center, one resident asked if the city would be working with neighboring cities, such as La Verne, to address homelessness.

DeFrank said the city will participate in a regional effort.

Another resident said homelessness is a problem that even the larger cities in the state have failed to address. Sandoval said countywide, there is an interest in finding ways to resolve the problem of homelessness. In the March 7 election, L.A. County voters agreed to tax themselves to raise the money needed to pay for the programs and services to get people off the street, he said.

That interest, combined with regional efforts in which each city takes on its share of assisting those living without shelter, will help make advances.

Every homeless resident has a story that led to living without shelter, Councilman Rubio Gonzalez said.

“Each one has a different set of needs,” he said. “It’s a matter of (asking) how did you get there and how can we help you?”

The new facility will help answer those questions, assist people in obtaining the services that will allow to get back into permanent housing and provide the support the need so they don’t wind up homeless again, he said.

Dad tells reporters he lives inside a gas station. Take a peek inside

 

Dad tells reporters he lives inside a gas station. Take a peek inside

 

Robert Guthrie saw a unique opportunity and seized it much to the shock of many friends, family, and even his own son.

When Robert noticed a run-down gas station that was nearly 100 years old for sale, he effectively found “treasure” in what most considered was trash. The gas station was a 2,000 square-foot space that was ready to be transformed and renovated into a suitable home. Many labeled Robert as crazy when he told them about his idea, but just wait until you see the end result. It’s stunning!

In the video below, Robert shows a tour of his home. It’s heavily influenced by the space’s previous life, Sinclair Gasoline, so you will notice various relics scattered throughout the home. Robert added a roof deck, installed a hydraulic-lift turned staircase, a jacuzzi, and a full-modern kitchen. While the exterior doesn’t seem like much, the interior is jaw-dropping. It’s a perfect example of how awesome creativity is!

Neverland Ranch, now Sycamore Valley Ranch, is re-listed for $67 million

Neverland Ranch, now Sycamore Valley Ranch, is re-listed for $67 million

Michael Jackson‘s Neverland Ranch, now known as Sycamore Valley Ranch, has hit the market yet again.

This time, the 2,700-acre estate, located in California’s Santa Ynez Valley, has an asking price of $67 million — a significant drop from the $100 million price tag it had back in 2015.

According to a report in the Los Angeles Times, listing agent Joyce Rey of Coldwell Banker said the original price allowed private equity firm Colony Capital, which entered into an ownership agreement with Jackson in 2008, “time to better determine the future of the ranch.”

“This quintessential California estate is now ready for the next chapter in its journey,” she said.

Michael Jackson’s ‘Neverland’ hits the market with a new name

Jackson, who died in 2009, purchased the ranch in 1987 for $19.5 million and lived here for 15 years, according to a 2015 report from the Wall Street Journal. The newspaper also reported that in 2008, after the King of Pop defaulted on a $24.5 million loan, Colony Capital bought the note for $23 million, formed a joint venture with the singer, and spent millions on upgrades with the intention of selling it.

According to the listing, which Rey’s office confirmed to ABC News was posted today, the 12,598 sq. ft. main residence features 16 bedrooms and 29 bathrooms. The property also boasts a lake, a pool house near a 14-foot deep lagoon-style pool, a movie theater, dance studio, barns, corrals and separate staff facilities.

Volunteers Constructed An Entire Community To House Homeless Veterans

~ I would help in any ways I could to get something like this in the Inland Empire ~

 

Volunteers Constructed An Entire Community To House Homeless Veterans

 

Many veterans sacrifice comfortable, lucrative lives to protect the liberties of their home country—only to find nothing left of those former lives when they return. In the face of rising veteran homelessness rates, due in part to inadequate medical and psychological resources, Missouri volunteers pooled their creativity, time, and money to create a community that welcomes veterans, completely free of charge.

The Veterans Community Project created Veterans Village, which sits on four acres of land outside of Kansas City and consists of 50 tiny homes, complete with bathrooms, kitchens, sleeping, and living areas.

Veterans Community Project
Veterans Community Project

The community is strategically situated near an outreach center which provides social and medical services to the residents and other veterans. A community center intended for more socializing and recreation is also in the works.

Veterans Community Project

Remarkably, each prefabricated home cost only $10,000—a pittance compared to the costs of prolonged hospitalization and/or temporary housing for homeless citizens.

Not only does the development work as a small success for the 50 veterans lucky enough to find accommodation there, but the scalability and low cost provides hope that the template can be recreated elsewhere, allowing disenfranchised veterans to focus on betterment, health, and pursuits, rather than on mere survival.

From the looks on a few of the veterans’ faces, it seems as if the verdict is already in.

Veterans Community Project