Part of Riverside’s Main Street to close for ‘Chow Alley’ plan

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Part of Riverside’s Main Street to close for ‘Chow Alley’ plan

Despite concerns about disappearing parking spaces, the block between 10th and 11th streets will shut as the city plans for ‘Chow Alley.’

Riverside’s Main Street pedestrian mall will add the block south of City Hall possibly as soon as this summer, a move that could make room for a year-round outdoor dining area and more attractions during the holiday Festival of Lights.

Changes will include replacing the asphalt with colored pavement that matches the rest of the mall and adding decorative seating with umbrellas. The project is being designed, and construction is expected to start this summer – when the block would close to car traffic – and wrap up in October, Public Works Director Kris Martinez said Wednesday, March 29.After hearing a handful of objections from people concerned about the loss of parking, the potential impact on nearby businesses and the expectation that alcohol would be served at future eateries, the City Council on Tuesday voted unanimously to extend the mall between 10th and 11th streets.

Officials have said they are working on agreements to replace street and handicapped parking that will be lost and provide some extra spaces. Security would be provided when the dining area is in use.

Through traffic would still be allowed on 10th and 11th streets.

The Chow Alley project, which includes food vendors, goes hand in hand with the street closure, but officials made clear that the council will decide on that in a separate vote that City Councilman Mike Gardner said could come in May.

The barriers that will block the street to cars will be removable, so they could be taken down for an annual charity hot rod show and the various parades that use the street.

The newest portion of the mall may also host the popular ice skating rink during the Festival of Lights, but the council delayed until April 11 a decision on where to put the rink for 2017. Gardner said the extra time will allow the city to confer with organizers of the annual Chanukah Festival, which uses the same area for its event each December.

Warning Orange County: Inland Empire catching up in livability!

 

Warning Orange County: Inland Empire catching up in livability!

Is the Inland Empire shedding its cheap-living image and getting ready to compete with its coastal brethren in terms of livability?

Gallup’s annual “well-being” rankings for the nation’s metropolitan areas are out and there’s a shrinking gap in the perception of lifestyle quality between Los Angeles and Orange counties and the Inland Empire.

L.A.-O.C. came in 53rd out of 189 metros this year – sandwiched in the rankings between Houston and Charlotte. That’s not bad company, but it’s down from No. 40 a year ago.

The Inland Empire came in at 73rd, between Nashville and Boise. What’s more noteworthy is the new ranking is up from 93rd for the previous year.

So, the perception gap between Southern California’s coastal counties and the Inland neighbors – 53 ranking spots for 2015 –has been sliced by more than half to 20 in 2016.

Why do blue states rank better than red in livability?

Gallup’s livability ranking is more touchy-feely than other quality-of-city scorecards. This “well-being index” is based on the firm’s constant polling of American adults’ feelings on five regional attributes: the sense of daily purpose; the social climate; financial opportunities; community pride; and local health.

I like this poll’s logic as its results have a discerning eye for what’s good and bad about California living.

In 2016, California had seven metros in the top 25 – Santa Cruz (third); San Luis Obispo (seventh); Santa Barbara (12th); Santa Rosa (17th); Salinas (19th); San Diego (22nd); and Visalia (25th) – and three in the bottom 25 – Chico (183rd); Bakersfield (172nd) and Stockton (166th).

It’s worth a moment to see what Gallup’s measurement of well-being says about gap between L.A.-O.C. and the Inland Empire.

On this national scale, both regions have relatively good rankings for a local sense of purpose and roughly equal mid-range scores for financial considerations.

L.A.-O.C.’s No. 18 ranking for healthy lifestyle may have beaten the Inland Empire, but a 43rd place finish is very respectable. Conversely, both regions scored poorly for sense of community.

The most noteworthy gap was in terms of social qualities that Gallup defined as “having supportive relationships and love in your life.” L.A.-O.C. won this ranking battle easily, 73rd to 134th. Perhaps the Inland Empire suffering from being a place where people move but consequently have fewer family ties.

The Inland Empire used to be just about cheap housing and a tough commute toward coastal jobs centers. With Riverside and San Bernardino now growing their own employment base, Gallup results show the livability gap is decidedly narrowing.

Perhaps some day soon, the “909” will be an equal brand.

$568K House Vs. $10 Million House

A little Buzzfeed video I thought was fun for all you buyers out there.

Enjoy!!!

And if you can buy in the Inland Empire you will get more bang for your buck! 😉

100-Year-Old Life Hacks That Are Surprisingly Useful Today

 

100-Year-Old Life Hacks That Are Surprisingly Useful Today

People don’t often look back on the early 1900’s for advice, but what if we could actually learn something from the Lost Generation? The New York Public Library has digitized 100 “how to do it” cards found in cigarette boxes over 100 years ago, and the tips they give are so practical that millennials reading this might want to take notes.


Back in the day, cigarette cards were popular collectibles included in every pack, and displayed photos of celebrities, advertisements, and more. Gallaher cigarettes, a UK-founded tobacco company that was once the largest in the world, decided to print a series of helpful how-to’s on their cards, which ranged from mundane tasks (boiling potatoes) to unlikely scenarios (stopping a runaway horse). Most of them are insanely clever, though, like how to make a fire extinguisher at home. Who even knew you could do that?

The entire set of life hacks is now part of the NYPL’s George Arents Collection. Check out some of the cleverest ones we could find below. You never know when you’ll have to clean real lace!

 

~ I love these and have used a couple! There is the example below and they have “how to’s” for testing butter – best way to slice thin bread – homemade water fountain for animals – clean an oil painting – three useful knots – increase lung power – and more! ~

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Renters Now Rule Half of U.S. Cities

 

Riverside’s historic Korea Town recognized

 

Riverside’s historic Korea Town recognized

A plaque was placed Thursday at the former Pachappa Camp.

The site of Riverside’s historic Korea Town was formally recognized Thursday, March 23, when officials installed a plaque marking it as a point of cultural interest.

The spot on Howard Avenue at Cottage Street was part of the former Pachappa Camp, which supporters say was the first organized Korean American settlement on the U.S. mainland. Korean independence leader Dosan Ahn Chang Ho and his family also spent time there.

Riverside Mayor Rusty Bailey, Key Cheol Lee, Korea’s consul general in Los Angeles, and officials from the Southern California Gas Co. attended the plaque unveiling. The gas company owns the land where Pachappa Camp once sat.

The Riverside City Council voted in December to make Pachappa Camp the city’s first point of cultural interest, after a campaign by officials at UC Riverside’s Young Oak Kim Center for Korean American Studies and research by the city’s historic preservation officer.

The new designation was created because the site isn’t eligible for other types of historic recognition because none of the original buildings remain.

Creative and Practical Ways To Use LEGO Around the House (Without Stepping On Any!)

~ warning these are not all House related, but they are all fun and creative! ~

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